Facts or opinions?

“Just stick to the facts.” “Well, in my opinion...” We’ve all heard comments like these. How would you explain the difference between a “fact” and an “opinion”? Books have been written on the subject; this post merely scratches the surface of what is arguably both a self-evident truth and the subject of ongoing philosophical debate. …

Should theology make objective claims?

Relatively speaking, ours is an age where subjectivity is king. Theology students, especially those with prior learning in the humanities, may feel uncomfortable with assertions of authority and objectivity with respect to biblical texts, dogmatic convictions, the systemisation of theology, and church tradition. I have known people to physically cringe when seeing a book title …

Developing my critical thinking skills

In my last post, I suggested that critical thinking is “a complex process of deliberation which involves a wide range of skills and attitudes,”[1] and that it requires effort and patience, but improves with practice. In other words, it is an important set of skills that can be learned. Good critical thinking skills are an …

What is critical thinking?

The ability to think critically, and the freedom to do so, are essential elements of good theological education – and of any modern democratic society. Theological students are expected to be active critical thinkers, and to develop their critical thinking skills in the context of their studies and in daily life.   The word “critical” …

Five more steps to better memory recall

Learning isn’t just about memorization, but we rely on memory and the ability to recall memories every day. Academic study places extraordinary emphasis on memory recall. In my previous post, I outlined five steps to improve your memory recall as you study. Here are five more steps to improve memory recall.   Write it down …