“The vital breath of the church”: Prayer, personalism and spiritual power in the thought of G. H. Morling

Prayer, worship and intimacy with God feature strongly in George Henry Morling’s evangelical approach to spirituality. In a diary entry dated 19 August 1928, Morling famously states, “There must be a very strong stand taken for doctrinal-experimental truth.”[1] His commitment to this principle prompted him to seek a balance between what he viewed as rival extremes …

The quest for serenity and union with Christ (part 2)

A paper presented to the Baptist Historical Society by Rev Rod Benson (part 2 of 2) Click here for Part 1 Despite his protestations to the contrary in the introduction,[1] G. H. Morling's book, The Quest for Serenity, is tightly and logically structured. Chapters 1-5 set the scene for the resolution of the quest in chapters 6 …

The quest for serenity and union with Christ (part 1)

A paper presented to the Baptist Historical Society by Rev Rod Benson (part 1 of 2) Although in frequent demand as a public speaker and Bible teacher for more than half a century, the Australian Baptist theologian and biblical scholar George Henry Morling formally published only two slim works. The first, titled The Quest for …

What would George do? (part 8)

G. H. Morling on suffering and grace In my previous post, I suggested that G. H. Morling cultivated an almost child-like faith in divine providence, benevolence and mercy; that with human freedom comes the potential for suffering; and that one should accept suffering as discipline or chastisement, use it as an opportunity for growth, and …

What would George do? (Part 6)

G. H. Morling on suffering and divine providence In previous posts (1, 2, 3, 4, and 5), I outlined aspects of the thought of Australian Baptist theologian G. H. Morling on the causes and purposes of suffering. In this and the next post, I discuss Morling’s thought on suffering as it relates to divine providence. …