The quest for serenity and union with Christ (part 2)

A paper presented to the Baptist Historical Society by Rev Rod Benson (part 2 of 2) Click here for Part 1 Despite his protestations to the contrary in the introduction,[1] G. H. Morling's book, The Quest for Serenity, is tightly and logically structured. Chapters 1-5 set the scene for the resolution of the quest in chapters 6 …

The quest for serenity and union with Christ (part 1)

A paper presented to the Baptist Historical Society by Rev Rod Benson (part 1 of 2) Although in frequent demand as a public speaker and Bible teacher for more than half a century, the Australian Baptist theologian and biblical scholar George Henry Morling formally published only two slim works. The first, titled The Quest for …

What would George do? (part 8)

G. H. Morling on suffering and grace In my previous post, I suggested that G. H. Morling cultivated an almost child-like faith in divine providence, benevolence and mercy; that with human freedom comes the potential for suffering; and that one should accept suffering as discipline or chastisement, use it as an opportunity for growth, and …

What would George do? (Part 6)

G. H. Morling on suffering and divine providence In previous posts (1, 2, 3, 4, and 5), I outlined aspects of the thought of Australian Baptist theologian G. H. Morling on the causes and purposes of suffering. In this and the next post, I discuss Morling’s thought on suffering as it relates to divine providence. …

What would George do? (Part 5)

G. H. Morling on further purposes of suffering   Not all suffering in our world can be assigned a purpose; nor, arguably, should it be. One problem in searching for purposive explanations of suffering, in contrast to causative purposes, is that so much is left to the imagination. For example, we may identify clear evidence-based …